Category Archives: Video

7 seconds and Hanuman Strikes Back

If you’ve been following my Monkey saga, you know that Monkeys
gain their power from Hanuman, the Monkey God of Hinduism,
and that – even so – Round 3 went to me …

Shortly thereafter, Rain poured down upon Kriti. As I sit watching the storm, I was overtaken by the urge to understand why even the rain feels different in India.
I grab my video camera and go out to my covered balcony. I need to get closer to the rain they call the retreating monsoon.
I think, “I mean it’s wet like in North America and falls from the sky down to the ground like in the Midwest … Yup …
the law of gravity functions here, but … something … just different ….” My thoughts trail off.

I fumble with my camera, not even sure what I’m doing or where I am going to point it.
I press Record and … I was shown the power of Hanuman

I’ll give you one guess what Hanuman’s traditional symbol is …

I have experience with lightning, but still …

Round 4: Monkeys.

Drats … HAAA…NUUU…MAN!

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Being taken for a ride … in Old Delhi

This post is a continuation of Finding Hotel Broadway and my description of my first full day in India. I’m in Old Delhi. I would have posted earlier, but as my frustrated post of two days ago describes, internet is pretty spotty here in India.

I walk out of Hotel Broadway around 11:30 am and was glad to be moving on from what was meant to be just a short excursion to start my exploration of Delhi. (Read My first day in Delhi and Finding Hotel Broadway).

I start to hoof it to the Red Fort, a major site in Old Delhi and a bit of a walk. A tuktuk pulls up to me and I think: “Not again!” The driver goes: “Where you go? Red Fort?” Hmm … He was correct!? I stop. He goes, “5 Rupees!” (A price well below market price: even I knew that. It was a give away). I think, “This guy is smart …” I mean what a good way to lure someone in. I think, “I’ll pay him 5 Rupees and be on my way. Let’s see what happens …” I get in and his game starts right away, but it was good – he knows his mark. He drives me to the Red Fort and starts his seduction to be my driver for the rest of the day. Nice and indirect: “Take you wherever you want me to go. Pay me what you want, if you are happy.” His name is Akbar.

He offers to drop me off at the Red Fort, wait for me and then take me on a cycle rickshaw all the way down Chandni Chowk, the main street in Old Delhi, which is exactly what I had planned to do. So, I say, “Ok.” He becomes my driver for the rest of the day, and it was mostly a good experience.

I knew when he picked me up that he was giving me slick game, and I was warned about these kinds of shenanigans. I commit to one thing at a time and feel like I could end the transaction whenever I wanted. The bottom line is that he took me to places I wanted to go (more, actually, than I thought I was going to do that day) and showed me many hidden sites. He did take me, however, to a few shops I didn’t think about going to. The deal is that he gets a commission for the people he brings to these specific shops, but he wasn’t pushy. If I didn’t want to go somewhere, we moved on. I didn’t buy anything at these shops, but BOY, OH BOY did the shop keepers try their best to get their commerce in my hands and my Rupees in theirs! I learned much about the ways of India.

I didn’t get any great history lessons from Akbar, but I didn’t mind. Rather, I saw – very quickly – much of Delhi and got introduced to some of its inner workings (albeit from a certain view point), which is exactly what I wanted for the day. I felt like my role, my position in this new machine I was in, became defined: I was the Western who helped keep this gray-market going. Akbar and I were two interlocking cogs in a machine, serving a very specific purpose to one another and to a larger cross-cultural mixture. It was a commercial baptism into India, and just like a religious baptism: you only do it once.

The video is a few clips from my ride down Chandni Chowk. Wish I could show more … Keep in mind that Chandni Chowk is not just an old road, but it is also a wide, well-developed road. The streets I was on earlier in the morning were much more crowded, mostly dirt and narrower and crazier!

The next day, Sunday, I spent on my own. There is too much to go into and to describe in detail; so, tomorrow I’ll post pictures of my 3 days in Delhi … if the internet is working for me! And, then I’ll move on to describe Varanasi…

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after a 4-year lull, i love juggling

Over 10 years ago, I made a goal to juggle 5 balls for 10 rounds.

I achieved 2, 3 and 4 ball patterns with a few tricks; and, eventually,
used my juggling in some of my performance work.

Samuel Nigro, Video

Triads, Cycles and Opposites, 2007

Samuel Nigro, Video

Triads, Cycles and Opposites, 2007

I practiced with my original 5 juggling balls until they fell apart and then bought 5 more
because I had not reached that elusive 5 ball aerial magic.

Shortly after this purchase, something happened. I just couldn’t bring myself to juggle.
I struggled with the block, but stayed stymied for the last 4 years, and
only touched my juggling props when I had to dust the shelves.

I’ve visualized juggling over these years – imagined, dreamed – but couldn’t bear doing it … pain … and, besides, I had other stuff to do.
Juggling was more like a hobby.

I picked up those 5 brand new juggling balls today:

what a joy!
finally!
relief!

more to come …

Juggling Balls, Samuel Nigro

Brand new juggling balls emerging from hiatus

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Saturn’s Rings … and the stirring of the Unknown

This video is out of this world … so amazing, it nearly made me cry … It was just introduced to me by a new FB friend, Marney Lieberman,
and is relevant to my last post:

The Three Body Problem and the Appropriation of Images ….

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How to break a stone – in five easy steps.

1. Move your mind:

example:

• Is the breaking of stone (or any material or space, for that matter) catastrophic or transformational? How is the view of the break changed when – additionally or solely – labeled “creative,” or “purposeful,” or “random,” or “predictable,” or “warranted,” or “gratuitous,” or “liminal,” or “signified?” (… to list a few common viewpoints) What are the criteria to judge such a label?

• What is the level of tragedy that is depicted in a specific break; or is the depiction a revolution, a rupture, or a salvation – however necessary, temporary or unexpected? How mediated would these outcomes be?

• More generally, What is the characteristic of the conflict that sustains the action, allowing it to be carried out – or is it really about an emergence of cooperation among various forcings?

• How can an initial read of the basic forms and actions that I deal with be reconciled with the deep geologic time and the wide historic import of stone and be brought into an epistemological rather than just a phenomenological discussion – and, really, how can the seriousness of these questions include a comic and humorous framework because of the unique demands of the human psyche?

• How does one move beyond the break – and beyond the tragic, the revolutionary, the ruptured, or the saved; the label, the criteria, the judgment: and to what end? Is there even an end (!?) and, if so, how strategic is it?

2. Move your body:

           example:

.
3. Repeat steps 1 and 2until the right stone presents itself.

4. Repeat steps 1 and 2 with chosen stoneuntil the method becomes clear.

5. Break.

I’m currently on step 3.

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Filed under Art, Geometry, Poem-ish, Sculpture, Video